Lifelong Civil Rights Advocate Maintains Fight for Equality

This year marks a century since women earned the hard-fought right to vote in the United States. That vigor for equality persists today thanks to lifelong advocates like Eleonore Krebs. Inspired by the suffragists from a century ago, the 83-year-old resident at Friendship Village Tempe has been involved in virtually every notable civil rights movement in recent decades.

“I’m grateful for all the women then and in between who have contributed so much,” said Eleonore. “They have provided a lot of examples for how we can achieve change today.”

Not only has Eleonore marched alongside protesters, she has helped organize and mobilize support for women’s health care liberties, child abuse victims, mental health care and educational opportunities for all.

“I first became aware of inequality when I was only 6 years old,” she explained. “It’s unfortunate that some of the issues keep playing out today. But if we face our problems and work through them, it’s always better on the other side.”

Eleonore continues to passionately fight for reform as a founding member of The Huddle political action group at Friendship Village. The nonpartisan collective liaises with political office holders on a variety of issues. With 2020 being an election year, voting rights are top of mind.

“If you want to make a change in a system, you can’t do it alone,” she explained, noting that The Huddle is still active despite the pandemic. “We get together online and are working on educating people about the importance of voting. Politics is the business of citizens, and it’s our duty to engage in it.”

Overall, Eleonore says her advocacy can be summed up by one of her father’s mantras: “If we use our power to empower those who feel powerless, we all win.”